Plastic Egg Genetics


Educational Innovations Blog

By Donna Giachetti

Never doubt our slogan, Teachers Serving Teachers®.  It’s the reason we come to work every day, and it’s certainly the reason for this blog.  On any given day, we actively search the Internet for nifty, new science gizmos, exciting new science discoveries, and as-yet-undiscovered (by us) teachers in the trenches of today’s classrooms.  We love exploring other teachers’ science blogs, videos, and lessons—and we send fan mail applauding their work more often than you might imagine. 

Read the rest of this entry »

Frog Competition Chaos


By Julie Pollard

“When am I going to ever use this?”  “Why do I even need to know this?”  These questions are the bane of the science teacher’s existence—or at least of mine.  Even though science is woven into every aspect of every day of our lives, my middle schoolers just can’t seem to make that leap.  They’re like frogs who don’t know how to jump. They still think of science as something done by nerds in white coats in labs.

During our unit on ecosystems and competition, my students seem to struggle with the concept of competition for abiotic factors.  They have no problem relating to the predator-and-prey, competition-for-food aspect of competition—which makes sense, if you’ve ever watched eighth grade boys racing for the last slice of pizza.

(more…)

Hey Now, You’re a Rock Star, Get Your Neuroscience On!


by Donna Giachetti

Want to bring neuroscience, cyborgs, and mind control to your classroom? Watch our Backyard Brains webinar, Wire Me Up!  Neuroscience in the K-12 Classroom.

 

(more…)

Setting Up a Bacterial Culture Lab


by Becca Fanucci

Bacteria is literally everywhere.  In fact, it’s estimated there are more bacterial cells in your body than human cells!  Students are always fascinated with growing bacteria.  It’s an awesome way to discover which surfaces are dirtier than others… or whether the “five second rule” about dropped food is really legitimate.  I usually present my bacterial culture lab during the first week of school.  Not only are students engaged, but it’s a good way to review variables and the steps needed to set up a controlled experiment.  

(more…)