Hey Now, You’re a Rock Star, Get Your Neuroscience On!


by Donna Giachetti

Want to bring neuroscience, cyborgs, and mind control to your classroom? Join Educational Innovations on February 20th for our Backyard Brains webinar, Wire Me Up!  Neuroscience in the K-12 Classroom.

 

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Neuroscience in a Box


Ted Beyer, Educational Innovations, Inc.By Ted Beyer

Though they are buzzwords, STEM and STEAM have a real purpose.  We all want to get this cross-discipline learning into our classrooms as soon as possible.  Yet we often run into a trade off between the desire for MORE and the reality of budgets.

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Ninja Walk – a databot Game!


by Robert O. Grover

The Databot Game fired up an intense new challenge recently. We were in Salt Lake City at the NSTA Regional Conference attended by thousands of science educators. The Databot Game is a fun approach to exploring the invisible world of data that surrounds us.   It facilitates learning about sensor data in a way that naturally engages students in learning core science concepts addressed by databot’s on-board sensors. Databot’s sensors were specifically designed to provide a plethora of options for educators to teach Earth Science, Physics, Chemistry, Life Science, and even Environmental Science.

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The Data Game and Student Engagement


by Robert O. Grover

One of the great challenges we face as educators each and every time we work with students is engagement.  What will it take to get a student interested in the topic at hand, whether it is computer science, social studies, math, science? We all share the same challenge: get them interested!

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Setting Up a Bacterial Culture Lab


by Becca Fanucci

Bacteria is literally everywhere.  In fact, it’s estimated there are more bacterial cells in your body than human cells!  Students are always fascinated with growing bacteria.  It’s an awesome way to discover which surfaces are dirtier than others… or whether the “five second rule” about dropped food is really legitimate.  I usually present my bacterial culture lab during the first week of school.  Not only are students engaged, but it’s a good way to review variables and the steps needed to set up a controlled experiment.  

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