Don’t Be Left in the Dark! The Great Eclipse August 21, 2017


by Priscilla Robinson

Science teachers aren’t the only ones energized about the eclipse of the Sun.  People everywhere are anticipated to take time on Monday to view this cosmic phenomenon.  All of North America will be in its path, with a huge swath of the United States witnessing a total solar eclipse.  From Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina, twelve states are in the path of totality.  So whether you are a teacher just back to school or a parent trying to make some final summer memories, check it out.  It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity for you and the kids.

Read the rest of this entry »


Tabletop Fossil Safari: Science Camp in a Box!


Tabletop Fossil Safari: Science Camp in a Box! Educational Innovations Blogby Priscilla Robinson

Dinosaurs inspire curiosity and wonder in scientists of all ages.  With the help of Educational InnovationsHome Science Lab: Tabletop Fossil Safari, young learners can conduct investigations at home to dynamically discover how fossils were created millions of years ago, and to better understand how they continue to be unearthed by paleontologists today.  Everything you need comes in the nifty Home Science Lab box: six activities organized in a booklet filled with easy-to-follow instructions, whimsical illustrations and photographs, assorted chemicals, household items, and of course, real fossils!

It’s so easy, even a grandmother can do it.  Seriously!

Read the rest of this entry »


How to Throw a Science-Themed Birthday Party


by Linda Dunnavant

Most kids find the idea of science thrilling.  It conjures up images of potions, explosions, and top-secret laboratories.  When I asked my son what kind of birthday party he wanted this year, he eagerly exclaimed, “A science party!”  That night, I was taken aback when I Googled science birthday party ideas.  Many of the suggestions seemed far too adult-led and complicated—not to mention expensive!

Read the rest of this entry »


Center of Mass Challenge


By Jeremy Johnson

In my 13 years of classroom teaching experience, I’ve learned a few tricks to keep my students from becoming overwhelmed—or bored—by their science textbooks.  One of my favorite tricks is to get my kids up on their feet, doing science instead of reading about it.

When I teach about gravity and center of mass, for example, I like to shake things up by turning our classroom into an impromptu biokinetics lab.  I challenge my students to perform a series of seemingly simple physical tests, described below.  Lift a chair?  Raise your leg?  Pick up a quarter?  No problem!  (Or so they think…)

Read the rest of this entry »


The Sun Is Pretty Hot Stuff!


Ted Beyer, Educational Innovations, Inc.by Ted Beyer

The sun is, on average, about 93,000,000 miles (149,668,992 kilometers) away from us.  That’s pretty darn far.  In fact, if the sun went out right now, we would not know about it for about eight minutes.  Not to worry, that’s not going to be a thing to fret about for quite a while—a couple of billion years last time I checked.

That huge (try 109 times as big as Earth) ball of fusion reactor up in our sky is arguably responsible for all of the energy we use on Earth.  Not just solar power, but all of it.  Fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas) were created from ancient plant and animal matter—which all lived because of the sun.

The Sun Is Pretty Hot Stuff! Educational Innovations Blog

  Image source: Stanford Solar Center

Hydropower is only possible because of the water cycle (best look that one up on your own, they won’t let me make these posts too long).  Wind power relies on, well, wind—and that is a byproduct of the warming and cooling of the atmosphere—and that’s the sun doing that warming too.  Atomic power uses heavy elements like Uranium, which was created in the hearts of suns.

I could go on and on, but I think you get the idea.

Read the rest of this entry »