DIY Bioplastics!


DIY Bioplastics - Educational Innovations Blog

by Sabrina Smoke

Making bioplastics is a fantastic experiment to try at home or in the classroom.  It’s a fun, hands-on way to learn about bioplastic alternatives that are environmentally safer for our planet than traditional plastics.  Creating a bioplastic keepsake is likely to inspire further investigations and, in some cases, even future careers for young scientists!  Plus, they’re gorgeous!

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Build an Artificial Hand


Educational Innovations Blog

by Donna Giachetti

Designing and building an artificial hand is a great science fair or classroom project.  It’s also a vivid, “hands-on” way to get your students thinking about how such robotic limbs are used in society and industry.  Whether your students work individually or in teams, this activity is a fantastic experience in creativity, problem solving, STEM, and engineering.  Plus, for some students, it may even lead to a future career inspiration!

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3D Printing in the Palm of Your Hand


Educational Innovations Blog

By Laurie Neilsen

I’ve wanted a 3D printer for a long time, but I live in a small apartment where space is limited.  That’s why I was thrilled when Educational Innovations, the company I work for, started selling 3D pens.  They’re much smaller and more affordable than 3D printers, and they don’t require any special computer programs to use.

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Keep Your Shirt On Review Game


Tami O'ConnorBy Tami G. O’Connor

By far, my students’ favorite way to review for tests and quizzes was a game we called “Keep Your Shirt On.” I found that I was able to use this game for virtually any subject and any grade level.  No matter what subject, my students’ scores increased dramatically!  As long as your students can read, they can use this tool.

Keep Your Shirt On was a great review game before math tests (multiplication, division, addition, subtraction or properties), Social Studies (state capitals, explorers, landforms…) and especially Science!

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Using Solar Cells to Teach Series and Parallel Circuits


By Marty Mathiesen

During the electricity unit in my high school physics class, I like to do an activity in which students determine the effect of having batteries placed in a series circuit and also in a parallel circuit.  We explore questions such as What are the similarities?  The differences?  What are the advantages of each method?  Do you see any patterns?

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