Gyrocopter Lesson


Tami O'Connorby: Tami O’Connor

As an elementary and middle school teacher and Girl Scout leader, I had a bag of tricks that I dug into frequently…  One of my favorites was the gyrocopter.  I always kept a template in my files and when teaching about air, friction, forces symmetry or flight, out it came.  It was simple enough for kindergarten students to build, yet complex enough to hold the attention of eighth graders as we discussed principles of drag, the characteristics of flight or even just isolating variables in an experiment.

Nearly 400 years before the invention of the helicopter, Leonardo da Vinci sketched out a machine designed to compress air in order to obtain flight.  When Igor Sikorsky designed the first successful helicopter in the late 1930’s, da Vinci’s spinning wing was his inspiration.

Today, you can easily build gyrocopters with your students to explore different designs and variables.

How Does It Work?

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Making Waves


Tami O'Connorby: Tami O’Connor

Energy is transported by waves.  That’s an important concept to teach students, but it’s not always an easy one for them to understand. At the beginning of our unit on the electromagnetic spectrum, my class and I made wave models so they could all see and understand how waves work.

The kids loved this activity when we did it in class and, when I run into former students, some tell me they still have their wave models hanging from their ceilings more than 10 years after we made them!

 

Materials:Wave model

  • Popsicle Sticks
  • Kite String
  • Low Melt Glue Gun
  • Ruler or Yard Stick
  • Tape
  • Pen, Pencil, or Marker

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Germ Discussion Starters


newsletterdidyouknowwbWhen the topic is germs, your teaching opportunities can expand in many directions—just like the droplet spread from a sneeze!

Not sure where to start?  Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Here you will find germ-related discussion starters, research ideas, current events worksheets, posters and more. Read the rest of this entry »


You Said It! Germ Product Reviews


newsletteryousaiditwb-cropEducational Innovations’ Glo Germ demonstration kit has been a fixture in science and health classes for years.  Here’s what some of our customers are saying about our Glo Germ powder, lotion and kit.

“I’ve used this with elementary through high school students.  It really makes an impression!  Usually it takes about 3 or 4 hand washings before they get all of the ‘germs’ off their hands and fingernails, etc.  Seeing is believing!
          —Shelley in Stillwater, OK

 

Glo Germ Kit“I have used the same kit for years; a little goes a long way.  Very good buy.  I used it to teach microbiology, anatomy, and forensic science.  It would be great for family and consumer science, too.”
Shelley in Stillwater, OK

 

“This product is amazing!  I used it with my middle school students and it completely captivated them to see that even after washing there hands they still had traces of germs between their fingers and in their nails.  It was a great way to start our germ unit and made them want to learn more.”
           —Jennifer in Grand Junction, CO

 

“Great for teaching infection to high school students. Just use the powder, not the lotion. Plant some on your hands as you shake the kids’ hands or on the classroom doorknob. Then shine the light and see where it has spread.”
Mary in Killeen, TX

 

“Works great under even the cheapest little UV flashlight. Really eye opening for kids when teaching how germs are spread or how ineffectively their hand washing are working. Worth the money as a little goes a long way.”
          —Sharon in Plymouth, MA

 

germ newsletter

 

 

 

 


Germ Humor


newsletterLOLwb-cropGerms are everywhere.  We could say they’re nothing to sneeze at, but that would be a pretty lame joke.

Enjoy these jokes and comics, share them with your students.  Why not insert a few riddles into a quiz or homework page?  Extra credit points for students who guess the right punchline!

If you have a favorite germ-related cartoon or joke, insert it below as a comment, or email us at socialmedia@teachersource.com.

Happy teaching!

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