Teaching Disease Prevention with White-Nose Syndrome in Bats


priscilla-wells-robinsonBy Priscilla Robinson

Teaching Disease Prevention

This summer, during a visit to Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky, I had an experience that reminded me of why teachers and parents should emphasize good hygiene and disease prevention habits to our children.  Whether fungal, bacterial, or viral, pathogens can be real threats to humans—and to wildlife.  Preventing the spread of infectious disease is something we can ALL do, if we are taught the proper steps.

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Germ Discussion Starters


newsletterdidyouknowwbWhen the topic is germs, your teaching opportunities can expand in many directions—just like the droplet spread from a sneeze!

Not sure where to start?  Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Here you will find germ-related discussion starters, research ideas, current events worksheets, posters and more. Read the rest of this entry »


You Said It! Germ Product Reviews


newsletteryousaiditwb-cropEducational Innovations’ Glo Germ demonstration kit has been a fixture in science and health classes for years.  Here’s what some of our customers are saying about our Glo Germ powder, lotion and kit.

“I’ve used this with elementary through high school students.  It really makes an impression!  Usually it takes about 3 or 4 hand washings before they get all of the ‘germs’ off their hands and fingernails, etc.  Seeing is believing!
          —Shelley in Stillwater, OK

 

Glo Germ Kit“I have used the same kit for years; a little goes a long way.  Very good buy.  I used it to teach microbiology, anatomy, and forensic science.  It would be great for family and consumer science, too.”
Shelley in Stillwater, OK

 

“This product is amazing!  I used it with my middle school students and it completely captivated them to see that even after washing there hands they still had traces of germs between their fingers and in their nails.  It was a great way to start our germ unit and made them want to learn more.”
           —Jennifer in Grand Junction, CO

 

“Great for teaching infection to high school students. Just use the powder, not the lotion. Plant some on your hands as you shake the kids’ hands or on the classroom doorknob. Then shine the light and see where it has spread.”
Mary in Killeen, TX

 

“Works great under even the cheapest little UV flashlight. Really eye opening for kids when teaching how germs are spread or how ineffectively their hand washing are working. Worth the money as a little goes a long way.”
          —Sharon in Plymouth, MA

 

germ newsletter

 

 

 

 


Germ Humor


newsletterLOLwb-cropGerms are everywhere.  We could say they’re nothing to sneeze at, but that would be a pretty lame joke.

Enjoy these jokes and comics, share them with your students.  Why not insert a few riddles into a quiz or homework page?  Extra credit points for students who guess the right punchline!

If you have a favorite germ-related cartoon or joke, insert it below as a comment, or email us at socialmedia@teachersource.com.

Happy teaching!

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Germs in the News


newsletternewswb-cropWhether it’s the Ebola virus or more commonplace “bugs,” we often hear about germs in the news.  Check out this selection of noteworthy news items.


Good Morning America goes into a classroom to see how quickly germs can spread.  (Our Glo-Germ powder makes a cameo appearance!)

http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/photos/video-classroom-experiment-reveals-quickly-germs-spread-26755004

 

In November 2014, Dutch researchers reported that 10 seconds of kissing can translate into 80 million germs moving from one person to the other.

www.webmd.com/news/20141117/every-kiss-begins-with-80-million-germs

 

Dirt as a source for new antibiotics?  Huh?

http://mic.com/articles/108020/science-finally-answers-life-s-oldest-question-can-i-eat-food-i-dropped-on-the-ground

 

Researchers have learned that bacteria can “communicate” with chemical signals.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150121083640.htm

 

What’s the germiest place in most homes?  That’s a good question… and the answers might surprise you and your students. 

www.webmd.com/women/home-health-and-safety-9/places-germs-hide