Engineering Discussion Starters


Discussion Starters - Educational Innovations NewsletterNeed help launching a class discussion on engineering? We’ve compiled some awesome ideas.  Some of these websites offer ready-to-go lessons… others share exciting interviews with scientists involved in engineering.  All of them are worth a visit!

If you find a worthy site that we haven’t mentioned here, please let us know in the comments section below. Read the rest of this entry »


Engineering TV


EI TV - Educational Innovations BlogWhy would someone want to become an engineer?  What do engineers do?  Videos are a great way to answer these questions.  If you’ve enjoyed videos on this topic, please share them with us!

Read the rest of this entry »


Classroom Coasters, Mazes and More!


Chris Herald

By Chris Herald
NSTA STEM Teacher Ambassador 2017

I always love when Spring arrives because we start physics topics in my eighth grade physical science class!  Don’t get me wrong—my first love is chemistry and I have a Master’s degree to prove it—but there’s just something about physics in the Spring.  My students delve into the topics of speed and momentum with great gusto.  Two highlights?  Rolling marbles down a ruler and designing their own Hot Wheels experiment.  Not only are these students exploring some key physics topics, they are ALSO getting a chance to dabble in engineering:  a great combination!

Read the rest of this entry »


The Physics of Bridges


How Bridges Are Built | Educational Innovations Blogby Lior Zitman

Bridges have changed greatly over the years.  Thanks to advances in building materials and machinery, building a bridge is now more precise than ever before.

Nevertheless, all these modern marvels come down to a few simple physics principles.  Our technologies may evolve, but some things—like physics—never change!

Every bridge, regardless of its form, must constantly balance the opposite forces of tension and compression.  How these forces work together is what makes each bridge type unique. Read the rest of this entry »


Making Scientifically-Accurate Snowflakes


By Priscilla Robinson

Snowflakes!  They arrive in flurries, storms and blizzards, not to mention “Winter Bomb Cyclones!”  I’ve always thought the science behind snowflakes is amazing.

A snowflake begins when a tiny dust or pollen particle comes into contact with water vapor high up in Earth’s atmosphere.  The water vapor coats the tiny particle and then freezes into a tiny crystal of ice.  This tiny crystal will be the “seed” from which a snowflake will grow.  The process is called crystallization.

Read the rest of this entry »