Potential and Kinetic Energy Explained


by Arthur Murray

Teaching about potential and kinetic energy is always exciting, whether your students are in kindergarten or college.  There is so much to explore, and the world is full of examples of these types of energy in action.  Any time that you’re chewing gum, typing on your computer, or launching a rubber band into the air…  you are demonstrating potential and kinetic energy in all its glory.

Read the rest of this entry »


Keep Your Shirt On Review Game


Tami O'ConnorBy Tami G. O’Connor

By far, my students’ favorite way to review for tests and quizzes was a game we called “Keep Your Shirt On.” I found that I was able to use this game for virtually any subject and any grade level.  No matter what subject, my students’ scores increased dramatically!  As long as your students can read, they can use this tool.

Keep Your Shirt On was a great review game before math tests (multiplication, division, addition, subtraction or properties), Social Studies (state capitals, explorers, landforms…) and especially Science!

Read the rest of this entry »


Using Solar Cells to Teach Series and Parallel Circuits


By Marty Mathiesen

During the electricity unit in my high school physics class, I like to do an activity in which students determine the effect of having batteries placed in a series circuit and also in a parallel circuit.  We explore questions such as What are the similarities?  The differences?  What are the advantages of each method?  Do you see any patterns?

Read the rest of this entry »


How Electricity Works: An Animated Guide


by Arthur Murray

Electricity is everywhere!  If you’ve ever experienced a power outage, you know how important this form of power is for our daily life. From brewing our morning coffee to keeping our smart phones charged, electricity is all around us.  It’s the spark of lightning during a thunderstorm or that tiny shock when you touch a doorknob.

Read the rest of this entry »


Engineering in the News


Engineering plays a prominent role in our lives, whether or not we realize it.  Every day, someone creates something we never heard of before:  a synthetic ice skating rink… a new form of cardboard that weighs less than a feather… a faster, lighter drone.  So it’s no wonder we had a tough time deciding on articles about new engineering feats!  Until it dawned on us that the engineers themselves, not their advances, are what really capture our interest.

Happy reading!

Read the rest of this entry »